Uncovers the key civil rights battle that immigrant children fought alongside the ACLU to ensure equal access to education within a xenophobic nation
Product Code: 5825
ISBN: 9780807024980
Format: Hardback
Publisher: Beacon Press
Published Date: 04/20/2021
Pages: 224
Availability:In stock
N/A
Price: $25.95

Journalist Jo Napolitano delves into the landmark ACLU case in which the School District of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, was sued for refusing to admit older, non-English speaking refugees and sending them to a high-discipline alternative school. In a legal battle that mirrors the Little Rock Nine and Brown v. Board of Education, 6 brave refugee students fought alongside the ACLU to demand equal access to education. The School I Deserve illuminates the lack of support immigrant and refugee children face in our education system and presents a hopeful future where all children can receive an equal education regardless of race, ethnicity, or their country of origin.

One of the students, Khadidja Issa, fled the horrific violence in war-torn Sudan with the hope of a safer life in the United States, where she could have access to an education. Instead, she was barred from enrollment by the School District of Lancaster and admitted to an alternative school with multiple abuse allegations. Napolitano follows Khadidja as she decides to join the lawsuit as the plaintiff in the Issa v. School District of Lancaster case. The fiery week-long showdown between the ACLU and the school district was ultimately decided by a conservative judge who issued a shocking ruling with historical implications. The School I Deserve brings to light the crucial and underreported legal battle that paved the way to equal access to education for countless immigrants and refugees to come.


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INTRODUCTION
From Colombia to Columbia in Forty Short Years

CHAPTER 1
The Longest Goodbyes

CHAPTER 2
A New World

CHAPTER 3
Beyond the Horses and Buggies

CHAPTER 4
The Uninvited

CHAPTER 5
Handle with Care

CHAPTER 6
Not on My Watch

CHAPTER 7
Big Leagues

CHAPTER 8
Not in Our Names

CHAPTER 9
This Land Is Your Land

CHAPTER 10
UnDACAmented

CHAPTER 11
Opening Arguments

CHAPTER 12
In Their Own Words

CHAPTER 13
Caps and Gowns

CHAPTER 14
Tough Crowd

CHAPTER 15
Disconnected

CHAPTER 16
A Missed Opportunity

CHAPTER 17
Granted

CHAPTER 18
Higher Ground

CHAPTER 19
A Room of Her Own

Acknowledgments
Notes

“Napolitano retraces Khadidja’s history with great dexterity . . . Backed by research, profiles, court testimonies, and interviews with teachers, refugees, and immigrant advocates, the book calls into question the vital essence of education and why, even in this modern era of accountability, these injustices persist . . . An eyebrow-raising report on education that is both enraging and heartbreaking.” - Kirkus Reviews

“Laden with compassion and detailed insights into the practices that threaten equal access to education, this is an eye-opening account of a precedent-setting case.” - Publishers Weekly

“Napolitano’s book should be the next step for people horrified by the plight of refugees, undocumented people, and unaccompanied minors.” - Booklist

“Napolitano’s compelling story of teenage refugees denied the same high school education as their Pennsylvania peers is both heartbreaking and infuriating. It’s an intimate story, and yet Napolitano’s exhaustive research also underscores the consequences of inequality. This book represents a historical moment as important as Brown v. Board of Education, and every democracy-loving American needs to read it.” - Amy Ellis Nutt, author of Becoming Nicole: The Transformation of an American Family

“Jo Napolitano’s The School I Deserve - and the legal case it chronicles - is a clarion call for America to live up to its ideals, as a place that embraces those fleeing hunger and persecution.” - Alex Kotlowitz, author of An American Summer, winner of the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize

“Khadidja Issa, a young Sudanese refugee who arrived with her family in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, with aspirations to become a nurse, had to sue her own school district to be admitted because, at eighteen, she was deemed too old to learn there. This little-known story of her titanic and ultimately triumphant battle, along with that of five other teenage refugees, for the education they deserved should be taught alongside the epic struggles of Ruby Bridges and the Little Rock Nine in the civil rights era. No racist mobs blocked Khadidja and her fellow refugees’ access to education, but the callously indifferent practices of her local school district had a similar effect. An important contribution to the ongoing examination of inequality in America.” - Dale Russakoff, author of The Prize: Who’s in Charge of America’s Schools?

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